Author: Rouf Dar

Storyteller from Kashmir read his work at https://roufdar.wordpress.com/a
November 12, 2016 /

Mirza Waheed in his second novel “The Book of Gold Leaves” introduced, what might appear to foreign, non-contextual readers a fictitious creation but, a realistic character in Kashmir known as the zaal. Describing it, Mirza says it was a “beast of dust” which made frequent rounds of the streets and trapped people who stood nearby, whisking them away to interrogation camps and subsequent disappearance. It was an ensemble of terror, violence and state-sponsored brute force. Mirza’s description emanated from a reality and had actual instances of forces trapping civilians using every possible method at their disposal.

September 1, 2016 /

“I will protest in summer in Kashmir” has become a cliche. This summer too has Azaadi written all over it. Everything seems to utter Azaadi. Every sound rhymes with Azaadi. Maa ki mamtaa. Behno ki ismat. Water flowing steadily in a nearby river. Tyres of vehicles hitting the newly macadamised road hard. Ticking of the clock at night. Chirping of birds every morning. Fan rotating at full speed as if spinning the yarn of freedom. Small children playing games of Azaadi, aping adults and inculcating resistance.

March 1, 2016 /

JNU as an event is multifaceted and has segregated the Indian community based on their perceptions towards Kashmir and the conflict. Sympathizers changed colours overnight. Those vouching for freedom, an ambivalent term in the present context, shut their mouth when the time to voice their opinions came. Those who spoke, tuned their views in such a manner as to avoid themselves being tagged as “anti-national”. They subdued ideologies to save their faces which they deemed to be of more significance than aligning with truth.”

February 11, 2016 /

“It takes a loud bang to make the deaf hear”, Bhagat Singh had famously said. After using violence, Bhagat Singh did not evade the site, rather handed himself to the British authorities and then would use courts to propagate his ideas. Maqbool Bhatt held a similar view. After he was imprisoned in Pakistan in the famous Ganga hijacking case, he wrote letters to his acquaintances and family wherein he professed that the act was aimed at falsifying claims of occupiers and superimposing truth upon them.

January 26, 2016 /

On India’s Republic Day, just 5 days away from the Gawkadal massacre, we shall hear Jumlas from Narendra Modi. We shall hear his rhetorical and controvertible claims on how India is rapidly evolving as a major superpower in the world and a worthy contender for a permanent place in the Security Council. Nobody expects him to speak against his party ideologues who lynched Mohammad Akhlaq or abetted the suicide of Dalit student Rohit Vemula.